Obesity

Office based motivational interviewing to prevent childhood obesity a feasibility study: Office-based motivational interviewing to prevent childhood obesity: a feasibility study

Parents in that a parent had to report his or her own height and the intensive group reported a significant net decrease weight after consent was obtained before study entry.

Children from all of the 3 study arms returned for a 6-month visit in which they were weighed and measured. Review of a 2-page checklist assessing eating and television viewing behaviors helped the pediatricians and RDs identify topics for MI at that session. Analysis of variance was used to examine within- and between-group changes in BMI. Another 2-day training session 1 year later was needed because of the prolonged time between the initial MI training and the start of recruitment required to gain approval from all of the institutional review boards. This rather large differential suggests that motivation may have differed among patients, physicians, or both in these 2 groups. This feasibility study had 4 objectives: 1 to determine whether physicians and registered dietitians RDs can successfully implement an office-based obesity prevention program using MI as the primary intervention; 2 to examine the feasibility of integrating RDs into a primary care office-based obesity prevention program; 3 to refine the study protocol and logistics in anticipation of a larger clinical trial; and 4 to examine, in the context of a short-term, nonrandomized study design, the impact of MI on patient body mass index BMI calculated as the weight in kilograms divided by the height in meters squared.

  • To alleviate this problem in a future study, we will allow telephone follow-up for the RDs as an alternative to face-to-face contacts after the initial counseling session. Our study protocol stipulated eligibility for 2 groups of children aged 3 to 7 years: 1 those with a BMI for age and sex at the 85th percentile or greater but below the 95th percentile; and 2 those with a BMI at the 50th percentile or greater but below the 85th percentile for whom 1 parent's BMI was 30 or greater.

  • Am J Public Health. The intervention phase lasted 6 months.

  • Main Outcome Measure Change in the body mass index—for-age percentile.

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After an audiotaped MI session, sthdy were requested to complete an evaluation form to assess their perceptions of counseling by the physician and RD. We believe that a brief dietary and activity patterns approach will be more feasible in a general office setting and can effectively identify potential change opportunities for the child and family. Save to Library Save. The enrollment of patients was lowest for the control group.

The pediatric primary care office remains a potentially important setting for the prevention or treatment of obesity in children and adolescents. The YAQ was returned to the rics. Analysis of variance was used to examine within- and between-group changes in BMI. Miller WR, Rollnick S. See More About Obesity Pediatrics.

Methods Citations. Slora, PhD ; Esther F. In our next study, we will expand the time for role-playing and provide training for the investigators in behavioral therapy as it relates to pediatric obesity. Highly Influential.

Difficulties were encountered in naires. Telephone-delivered MI sessions have been shown to be effective in other settings, 22 and we believe that this approach provides a potentially reimbursable model for dissemination if fezsibility intervention is proven effective. Get free access to newly published articles Create a personal account or sign in to: Register for email alerts with links to free full-text articles Access PDFs of free articles Manage your interests Save searches and receive search alerts. To alleviate this problem in a future study, we will allow telephone follow-up for the RDs as an alternative to face-to-face contacts after the initial counseling session. Any future study should be a randomized controlled clinical trial with cluster randomization used to avoid contamination between subjects but with practices separated geographically.

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Our study protocol stipulated eligibility for 2 groups of children aged 3 to 7 years: 1 those with a BMI for age and sex at the 85th percentile or greater but below the 95th percentile; and 2 those with a BMI at the 50th percentile or greater but below the 85th percentile for whom 1 parent's BMI was 30 or greater. Mrdjenovic GLevitsky DA Nutritional and energetic consequences of sweetened drink consumption in 6 to 13 year old children. They received instruction in the protocol, including measurement technique, through a telephone conference with study staff.

  • A limiting factor in our study was the nonrandom assignment of clinics to treatment groups, a process that was based on factors such as availability of collaborating RDs and the willingness of the pediatricians to comply with study procedures. No-show visits were costly to the pediatricians and RDs, so we recommend reimbursing the pediatricians and RDs for no-show visits not cancelled within 24 hours.

  • After an audio- tients recruited the goal was 10 patients per practice. A total of 91 eligible patients were enrolled from 14 practices between April 1,and November 30, Table 2.

  • The pediatricians told us that there were missed opportunities when children who might have qualified for the study were seen at sick care visits.

  • Difficulties were encountered in coordinating the schedules of the pediatricians and RDs.

  • The pa- Setting: Primary care pediatric offices.

  • Interventions for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in children aged five years and under.

Objective To determine whether pediatricians motifational dietitians can implement an office-based obesity prevention program using motivational interviewing as the primary intervention. Motivational Interviewing: Pre- Design Nonrandomized clinical trial. Eight parents from the minimal group and 8 from the intensive group who completed the evaluation form after an audiotaped MI session at 1 month rated their reactions to the counseling sessions with the physician minimal and intensive groups and the RD intensive group only Table 5.

Thoma KA. Interventions: Pediatricians and registered dietitians in the intervention groups received motivational interviewing training. In the minimal study arm, the pediatrician met with the parent for a scheduled to minute MI session; the MI intervention was also scheduled for 10 to 15 minutes in the intensive group but was followed by a to minute MI session with the RD. See More About Obesity Pediatrics. Gov't Research Support, U.

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Hamre R. Pediatricians and RDs in the minimal and intensive groups attended a study orientation and completed ohesity 2-day MI training session before the intervention. Given physicians' longitudinal relationships with families and their regular monitoring of patients' weight and height, the pediatric primary care office represents an important setting for the prevention or treatment of childhood obesity. Robert P.

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  • Two practices enrolled no patients, 2 enrolled 1 patient each, and the remaining 10 practices averaged 9 patients recruited the goal was 10 patients per practice. Objective: To determine whether pediatricians and di-etitians can implement an office-based obesity preven-tion program usingmotivational interviewing as the pri-mary intervention.

  • Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med.

  • Study supervision : Schwartz, Wasserman, Slora, and Thoma. Dietz WH.

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  • Parents of children in the minimal intervention group received 1 motivational interviewing session from the physician, and parents of children in the intensive intervention group received 2 motivational interviewing sessions each from the pediatrician and the registered dietitian.

Improving participant retention. Many challenges remain in designing and implementing research to test the effectiveness of the MI approach in practice settings, but practice-based research networks afford the opportunity to conduct the additional studies needed to make the office setting an effective site for obesity intervention. Purchase access Subscribe to the journal. One or 2 of the first MI sessions presented by each pediatrician minimal and intensive groups and RD intensive group only were audiotaped and used for clinical supervision and quality control. Create a personal account to register for email alerts with links to free full-text articles.

Children in foster care, institutions, or group care were excluded, as were children with chronic medical disorders. Pediatricians and RDs in the minimal and intensive groups attended a study orientation and completed a 2-day MI training session before the intervention. Thus, there was no evidence of selective attrition in the study. Physicians were frustrated when they spent time in recruitment but the child did not qualify for the study owing to the parent's BMI. The pediatricians told us that there were missed opportunities when children who might have qualified for the study were seen at sick care visits.

Management of child and adolescent obesity: attitudes, barriers, skills, and training needs among health care professionals. Rockett H. Thoma KA. Key strategies such as asking open-ended questions, using reflective listening, considering the pros and cons of change, decreasing resistance, and assessing the patient's interest and confidence in making change were modeled by the trainers and practiced in small groups by the physicians and RDs. Robinson TN Reducing children's television viewing to prevent obesity: a randomized controlled trial.

ARTICLE Office-Based Motivational Interviewing to Prevent Childhood Obesity A Feasibility Study

View Metrics. Table 3. One or 2 of the first MI sessions presented by each pediatrician minimal and intensive groups and RD intensive group only were audiotaped and used for clinical supervision and quality control. Table 4.

  • Myers EF. This latter form required only 5 minutes to complete.

  • Download pdf. Many challenges remain in designing and implementing research to test the effectiveness of the MI approach in practice settings, but practice-based research networks afford the opportunity to conduct the additional studies needed to make the office setting an effective site for obesity intervention.

  • Two patients in the minimal group and 3 in the intensive group were measured and weighed at 6 months but did not have a follow-up survey completed by their parents.

  • Robinson TN. Nutritional and energetic consequences of sweetened 1.

Robinson TN Reducing children's television viewing to prevent obesity: a randomized controlled trial. Motivarional feedback from the audiotaped MI sessions by the clinical psychologist Santhi Periasamy, PhD was positively received and considered valuable. Citations Feedback obtained from the pediatricians, RDs, parents, and office staff suggested significant changes for a future expanded clinical trial. Kathleen Thoma. Robinson TN.

This rather large differential suggests that motivation may have differed among patients, physicians, or both in these obesitt groups. Only 1 pediatrician in each practice participated in the study. Highly Influenced. The assignment of 5 practices to each arm was also nonrandom, including geographic proximity to 1 or more of the investigators, which afforded the ability to closely monitor study progress and access to participating RDs.

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Create Alert Alert. Privacy Policy. Mrdjenovic GLevitsky DA Nutritional and energetic consequences of sweetened drink consumption in 6 to 13 year old children. Gov't Research Support, U. This requirement meant that a parent had to report his or her own height and weight after consent was obtained before study entry.

To compare the before-after mean change between 2 groups, we used the t test for independent samples estimated using SAS Proc TTest. Analysis of variance was used to examine within- and between-group changes in BMI. Telephone-delivered MI sessions have been shown to be effective in other settings, 22 and we believe that this approach provides a potentially reimbursable model for dissemination if our intervention is proven effective. Review of a 2-page checklist assessing eating and television viewing behaviors helped the pediatricians and RDs identify topics for MI at that session. For a future study, the control pediatricians will attend a half-day study orientation and continuing medical education workshop on pediatric obesity.

This requirement meant that a parent had office based motivational interviewing to prevent childhood obesity a feasibility study report his or her own height and weight after consent was obtained before study entry. The parents in the minimal and intensive groups were given tip sheets on healthy eating and activity as well as a video that modeled parental behavior around feeding issues, both of which were produced by the CDC and tested by 2 of us R. Because of the short study duration 6 months and methodological problems caused by nonrandom assignment of patients and physicians to intervention and control groups, we did not expect that the observed changes in BMI non—statistically significant decreases of 0. Criteria included the child being aged 3 to 7 years, being a patient seen at a well-child care visit with a BMI for age and sex at the 85th percentile or greater but below the 95th percentile or at the 50th percentile or greater but below the 85th percentile with at least 1 parent's BMI being 30 or greater.

Parents of children chuldhood the minimal intervention group received 1 motivational interviewing session from the physician, and parents of children in the intensive intervention group received 2 motivational interviewing sessions each from the pediatrician and the registered dietitian. Review of a 2-page checklist assessing eating and television viewing behaviors helped the pediatricians and RDs identify topics for MI at that session. Related Papers. See More About Obesity Pediatrics. At 6 months' follow-up, there was a decrease of 0. Privacy Policy.

In our feasibility pilot study, we restricted recruitment to well-child care visits. The pediatricians told us that there were missed opportunities when children who might have qualified for the study were seen at sick care visits. Thoma KA .

Interviewung interventions and motivational in- Each practice was asked to recruit 10 patients. Dropouts were those patients who did not re- sician and RD. Motivational interviewing counselors rely heavily on reflective listening and encourage patients to find their own meanings for change as well as their own solutions. Abstract OBJECTIVE: To determine whether pediatricians and dietitians can implement an office-based obesity prevention program using motivational interviewing as the primary intervention. Institutional sign in: OpenAthens Shibboleth.

Therefore, for a future study, etetic Association, the Health Resources and Services Ad- we plan to use an abbreviated 2- to 3-page survey focus- ministration Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Mead ing on 5 priority behaviors associated with pediatric obe- Johnson Nutritionals, and the American Academy of Pe- sity sugar-sweetened drinks, snacks, dining out, fruit and office based motivational interviewing to prevent childhood obesity a feasibility study. Cochrane Database Syst Rev1107 Nov Results: At 6 months' follow-up, there was a decrease of 0. To compare the before-after mean change between 2 groups, we used the t test for independent samples estimated using SAS Proc TTest. The study had 3 arms: 1 control standard care ; 2 minimal intervention physician only ; and 3 intensive intervention physician and RD Table 1. Objective To determine whether pediatricians and dietitians can implement an office-based obesity prevention program using motivational interviewing as the primary intervention. Acknowledgment: We are grateful to the following pe- The pediatric primary care office remains a potentially diatricians and dietitians for their participation in the important setting for the prevention or treatment of obe- study: Nimi Auerbach, PhD, Iris Buchanan, MD, Julie Dil- sity in children and adolescents.

Purchase access Subscribe now. Interventions Pediatricians and registered dietitians in the intervention groups received motivational interviewing training. Back to top Article Information.

Main outcome measure: Change in the body mass index-for-age percentile. Resnicow KA. Difficulties were encountered in coordinating the schedules of the pediatricians and RDs. Analysis of variance was used to examine within- and between-group changes in BMI.

  • Given physicians' longitudinal relationships with families and their regular monitoring of patients' weight and height, the pediatric primary care office represents an important setting for the prevention or treatment of childhood obesity. Hamre and W.

  • Requiring a dedicated office assistant as a study coordinator should facilitate recruitment, retention, and overall study implementation.

  • View 5 excerpts, references methods and background. Twitter Facebook Email.

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One of the 5 minimal intervention practices dropped out before the study began. Abstract Objective: To determine whether pediatricians and di-etitians can implement an office-based obesity preven-tion program usingmotivational interviewing as the pri-mary intervention. Arch Pediatr viewing in health promotion: it sounds like something is changing. Dropouts were those patients who did not re- sician and RD. Sign in to make a comment Sign in to your personal account. The main objective of this pilot study was to determine the feasibility of primary care pediatricians and RDs implementing an office-based obesity prevention program using MI as the chief intervention strategy.

Pediatricians and of MI is nonjudgmental, empathetic, and encourag- RDs in the minimal and intensive groups attended a study ori- ing. Only 1 pediatrician in each practice participated in the training study. Sites were assigned to intervention and control groups in a cluster trial scheme. Health Psychol. Remember me on this computer.

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Explore citation contexts and check if this article has been supported or disputed. Download pdf. However, additional studies are needed to demonstrate the efficacy of this intervention in practice settings. We recruited 15 pediatricians from separate practices belonging to Pediatric Research in Office Settings, the national practice-based research network of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

A log and all study forms and documents were kept in a folder separate from the patient's record to ensure confidentiality in all of the study groups. Diet and activity measures. SchwartzR. View 3 excerpts, cites background. Robert P.

Difficulties were encountered in coordinating the schedules of the pediatricians and RDs. The pa- Setting: Primary care pediatric offices. Enrollment of patients was lowest in the control group. Better incentives could be tor should facilitate recruitment, retention, and overall given to parents for completing the study question- study implementation. A total of 91 eligible patients were enrolled from 14 practices between April 1,and November 30, Table 2.

  • The parents in the minimal and intensive groups were given tip sheets on healthy eating and activity as well as a video that modeled parental behavior around feeding issues, both of which were produced by the CDC and tested by 2 of us R. Hamre and W.

  • Mrdjenovic G, Levitsky DA. Children from all of the 3 study arms returned for a 6-month visit in which they were weighed and measured.

  • Correspondence: Robert P. After an audiotaped MI session, parents were requested to complete an evaluation form to assess their perceptions of counseling by the physician and RD.

  • Completed questionnaires were mailed to the Channing Laboratory, Boston, Mass, for analysis.

  • Similar Articles To arrive at the top five similar articles we use a word-weighted algorithm to compare words from the Title and Abstract of each citation.

Parents of children in the minimal intervention group received 1 motivational interviewing session from the physician, and parents of children in the intensive intervention group received 2 motivational interviewing sessions each from the pediatrician and the registered dietitian. Mi training. Enrollment of patients was lowest in the control group. Publication Type. The pediatricians and RDs felt they needed more role-playing experience using open-ended questions, reflective listening, building motivation, and eliciting change talk. There were no between-group differences in the percentages qualifying by the 2 main entry criteria. Sign in to save your search Sign in to your personal account.

Citation Schwartz, Robert P. Children from all of the 3 study arms returned for a 6-month visit in which they were weighed and measured. In place of an obesity-oriented intervention, the parents in the control group received 2 safety handouts provided by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Pediatrics ; PubMed Google Scholar. View 3 excerpts, cites background and results.

Slora, PhD ; Esther F. Dietz WH. Health Psychol. A log and all study forms and documents were kept in a folder separate from the patient's record to ensure confidentiality in all of the study groups.

Pediatricians and RDs in the minimal and intensive groups attended a study orientation and completed a 2-day MI training session before the intervention. Highly Influential. Purchase access Subscribe to the journal. Office-based motivational interviewing to prevent childhood obesity: a feasibility study. Patients and families were required to speak the English language and have a working telephone.

Sullivan S. Similar Articles To arrive at the top five similar articles we use a word-weighted algorithm to compare words from the Title and Abstract of each citation. Click here to sign up. We therefore recommend recruitment at sick and being very satisfied with the pediatrician visit, and all were well care visits for future studies. Sign in to save your search Sign in to your personal account. They had the same motivational interviewing training.

Rent this article from DeepDyve. Management of child and adolescent obesity: attitudes, barriers, skills, and training needs among health care professionals. We recruited 15 pediatricians from separate practices belonging to Pediatric Research in Office Settings, the national practice-based research network of the American Academy of Pediatrics. View 1 excerpt, cites results. Hamre and W.

  • Study supervision : Schwartz, Wasserman, Slora, and Thoma.

  • The Archives offers collections of articles in specific topic areas to make it easier for phy- sicians to find the most recent publications in a field.

  • Recruitment began April 1,and the study was completed by June 30, Create a free personal account to make a comment, download free article PDFs, sign up for alerts and more.

  • Resnicow, PhD. Myers and S.

Each practice was asked to recruit 10 patients. Setting: Primary care pediatric offices. Create Alert Alert. To alleviate this problem in a future study, we will allow telephone follow-up for the RDs as an alternative to face-to-face contacts after the initial counseling session. Wasserman and E.

Children in the control group mean age, 5. Institutional sign in: OpenAthens Shibboleth. Purchase access Subscribe to the journal. In the minimal study arm, the pediatrician met with the parent for a scheduled to minute MI session; the MI intervention was also scheduled for 10 to 15 minutes in the intensive group but was followed by a to minute MI session with the RD. Prior to the first MI counsel- cow. After consent was ob- fective in other settings,22 and we believe that this approach tained, the patients were given an appointment for a provides a potentially reimbursable model for dissemina- 1-month counseling visit. Documents: Advanced Search Include Citations.

Save to Library Save. Pediatricians and RDs in the minimal and intensive groups attended a study orientation and completed a 2-day MI training session before the intervention. Pediatricians and registered dietitians in the intervention groups received motivational interviewing training. View 3 excerpts, cites background. Rent this article from DeepDyve.

The assignment of 5 practices to each arm was also nonrandom, including geographic proximity to 1 or more Minimal Intensive of the investigators, which afforded the ability to closely moni- Control Intervention Intervention tor study progress and access to participating RDs. Parents completed a second YAQ mal, and intensive groups, respectively. Motivational interviewing counselors rely heavily on reflective listening and encourage patients to find their own meanings for change as well as their own solutions. Slora, PhD; Esther F.

View 5 excerpts, references methods and background. Slora, PhD ; Esther F. Research Feed. Physicians expressed dissatisfaction with excessive paperwork and the time required to fill out recruitment and other forms. Changes in behavior patterns. Privacy Policy Terms of Use.

Dropouts were those patients who did not re- sician and RD. Study supervision: Schwartz, Wasserman, Slora, and ing session, parents also filled out a 2-page checklist as- Thoma. Another 2-day training session 1 year prevenh was Motivational interviewing counselors basex heavily on needed because of the prolonged time between the initial MI reflective listening and encourage patients to find their training and the start of recruitment required to gain approval own meanings for change as well as their own solu- from all of the institutional review boards. We believe that a brief dietary and activity patterns approach will be more feasible in a general office setting and can effectively identify potential change opportunities for the child and family. The pediatricians in the control group did not attend the study orientation session or the MI training. Sign in to save your search Sign in to your personal account. At the conclusion of the study, the con- My pediatrician helped me think about changing 10 63 trol pediatricians will be offered full training in MI.

Physicians expressed dissatisfaction with excessive paperwork and the time required to fill out recruitment and other forms. Conclusions: Motivational interviewing by bxsed and dietitians is a promising office-based strategy for preventing childhood obesity. At the 6-month follow-up, there were mean decreases in BMI of 0. The YAQ was returned to the pediatric office at the 1-month visit described later or by mail control group. Sign in to make a comment Sign in to your personal account.

At the conclusion of the offcie, the control pediatricians will be offered full training in MI. Launch Research Feed Feed. There were no between-group differences in the percentages qualifying by the 2 main entry criteria. Get free access to newly published articles. Mrdjenovic GLevitsky DA Nutritional and energetic consequences of sweetened drink consumption in 6 to 13 year old children.

Purchase access Subscribe intervkewing the journal. However, additional studies are needed to demonstrate the efficacy of this intervention in practice settings. Sign in to make a comment Sign in to your personal account. The intervention phase lasted 6 months. Better incentives could be given to parents for completing the study questionnaires.

In place of an obesity-oriented intervention, the parents in intervieewing control group received 2 safety handouts provided by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Sign in to download free article PDFs Sign in to access your subscriptions Sign in to your personal account. Another 2-day training session 1 year later was needed because of the prolonged time between the initial MI training and the start of recruitment required to gain approval from all of the institutional review boards. Dumitru and K.

The parents in the minimal and intensive groups were given tip sheets on healthy eating and activity as well as a video that modeled parental interviesing around feeding issues, both of which were produced by the CDC and tested by 2 of us R. To browse Academia. Therefore, for a future study, we plan to use an abbreviated 2- to 3-page survey focusing on 5 priority behaviors associated with pediatric obesity sugar-sweetened drinks, snacks, dining out, fruit and vegetable intake, and television viewing. In the future, we will suggest that the first visit occur as soon as possible after enrollment. The YAQ was returned to the pediatric office at the 1-month visit described later or by mail control group.

Dietz WH. Because the 1-year gap between the initial orien- coordinating the schedules of the pediatricians and RDs. Participants: Ninety-one children presenting for well-child care visits met eligibility criteria of being aged 3 to 7 years and having a body mass index calculated as the weight in kilograms divided by the height in meters squared at the 85th percentile or greater but lower than the 95th percentile for the age or having a normal weight and a parent with a body mass index of 30 or greater. Pediatrics ; PubMed Google Scholar.

Interventions for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in children aged five years and under. Resnicow, PhD Objective: To determine interviwing pediatricians and di- sion from the physician, and parents of children in the etitians can implement an office-based obesity preven- intensive intervention group received 2 motivational in- tion program using motivational interviewing as the pri- terviewing sessions each from the pediatrician and the mary intervention. View Metrics. Clin Pediatr Phila48 421 Jan

May Schwartz RP, et al. Design: Nonrandomized clinical trial. Sign in to download free article PDFs Sign in to access your subscriptions Sign in to your personal account.

Changes in eating behaviors and television viewing generally did not correlate with BMI changes data not shown. View 3 excerpts, cites background and results. One of the 5 minimal intervention practices dropped out before the study began. Primary care screening for childhood obesity: a population-based analysis. There were no between-group differences in the percentages qualifying by the 2 main entry criteria. Nonrandomized clinical trial.

Lifestyle intervention in primary care settings improves obesity parameters among Mexican youth. Cited by: 11 articles PMID: Miller WR, Rollnick S. Affiliations All authors 1. Improving recruitment.

The 15 sfudy were chosen in nonrandom fashion to achieve geographical dispersion, ethnic and racial diversity of patients, and an urban-rural balance. Create a free personal account to make a comment, download free article PDFs, sign up for alerts and more. View 1 excerpt, cites results. Save to Library Save. Some features of the site may not work correctly.

Interventions: Pediatricians and registered dietitians in the intervention groups received sudy interviewing training. For a future study, we plan to eliminate parents' BMI from the eligibility criteria, expand the age group to ages 2 to 8 years, and expand the BMI criteria to the 85th percentile or greater but below the 97th percentile to accommodate the pediatricians' desire to enroll younger children and children who are heavier but not morbidly obese. Related Citations Motivational interviewing for pediatric obesity: Conceptual issues and evidence review. Fifteen pediatricians belonging to Pediatric Research in Office Settings, a national practice-based research network, and 5 registered dietitians were assigned to 1 of 3 groups: 1 control; 2 minimal intervention pediatrician only ; or 3 intensive intervention pediatrician and registered dietitian. As previously noted, the no-show rate for this visit was high.

Motivational interviewing for pediatric obesity: Conceptual issues and evidence review. A motivational interviewing intervention terviewing with children, adolescents, and their parents in pediatric healthcare to increase fruit and vegetable intake through Black churches: results of the Eat settings: a review. They received instruction in the protocol, includ- meters squared. Share this article Share with email Share with twitter Share with linkedin Share with facebook. Keyphrases article office-based motivational interviewing childhood obesity feasibility study national practice-based research network ninety-one child minimal intervention pri-mary intervention intensive intervention eligibility criterion fifteen pediatri-cians well-child care visit registered dietitian pediatric research regis-tered dietitian office setting primary care pediatric office nonrandomized clinical trial body mass index.

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Ambul Pediatr. Gema Dumitru Search articles by 'Gema Dumitru'. Motivational interviewing improves weight loss in women with type 2 diabetes. The modified YAQ the standard YAQ is a reproducible and valid questionnaire 10 included food groups and sets of questions covering 5 areas reported to be associated with weight gain in children: sweetened drinks, snacks and desserts, fruits and vegetables, dining out, and television viewing. Privacy Policy.

Click here to sign up. Ambul Pediatr. Sign in to access your subscriptions Sign in to your personal account. However, additional studies are needed to demonstrate the efficacy of this intervention in practice settings. Another 2-day training session 1 year later was Motivational interviewing counselors rely heavily on needed because of the prolonged time between the initial MI reflective listening and encourage patients to find their training and the start of recruitment required to gain approval own meanings for change as well as their own solu- from all of the institutional review boards. Table 2.

The pediatric primary care office remains a potentially important setting for the prevention or treatment of obesity in children and adolescents. Fifteen pediatricians belonging to Pediatric Research in Office Settings, a national practice-based research network, and 5 registered dietitians were assigned to 1 of 3 groups: 1 control; 2 minimal intervention pediatrician only ; or 3 intensive intervention pediatrician and registered dietitian. Thus, there was no evidence of selective attrition in the study. This latter form required only 5 minutes to complete. This Issue. Design: Nonrandomized clinical trial.

Because of the short study duration 6 months and methodological cyildhood caused by nonrandom assignment of patients and physicians to intervention and control groups, we did not expect that the observed changes in BMI non—statistically significant decreases of 0. Study supervision : Schwartz, Wasserman, Slora, and Thoma. Sign in to download free article PDFs Sign in to access your subscriptions Sign in to your personal account.

Both parents and physicians complained about its length and complexity and a few parents refused to complete the final questionnaire. Incentives could be given to physicians for patients completing the study. At the time of the study, Pediatric Research in Office Settings comprised practitioners from pediatric practices in the 50 states and Puerto Rico. Create a free personal account to download free article PDFs, sign up for alerts, customize your interests, and more. Schwartz, R. Primary care screening for childhood obesity: a population-based analysis. Motivational interviewing counselors rely heavily on reflective listening and encourage patients to find their own meanings for change as well as their own solutions.

Sullivan S. View 5 excerpts, references background and methods. Ninety-one children presenting for well-child care visits met eligibility criteria of being aged 3 to 7 years and having a body mass index calculated as the weight in kilograms divided by the height in meters squared at the 85th percentile or greater but lower than the 95th percentile for the age or having a normal weight and a parent with a body mass index of 30 or greater. The control pediatricians may have felt less ownership in the study because they did not attend the orientation session and received their protocol instruction through a telephone conference with study staff.

This Issue. View on PubMed. Management of child and adolescent obesity: attitudes, barriers, skills, and training needs among health care professionals. Improving recruitment. Has PDF.

Create a free personal account to make a comment, download childhoor article PDFs, sign up for alerts and more. Effects of fast food consumption the preparation of the manuscript. Office-based motivational interviewing to prevent childhood obesity: a feasibility study Archives of Pediatrics …, Sign in to make a comment Sign in to your personal account. To compare the before-after mean change between 2 groups, we used the t test for independent samples estimated using SAS Proc TTest.

DOI: Create a free personal account to download free article PDFs, sign up for alerts, and more. Patients and stufy were required to speak the English language and have a working telephone. The pediatricians believed that some parents lost their enthusiasm for the study during this time. Fifteen pediatricians belonging to Pediatric Research in Office Settings, a national practice-based research network, and 5 registered dietitians were assigned to 1 of 3 groups: 1 control; 2 minimal intervention pediatrician only ; or 3 intensive intervention pediatrician and registered dietitian. Launch Research Feed Feed.

Create a free personal account to make a comment, download free article PDFs, sign up for alerts and more. Three patients in the intensive group had only 1 instead of 2 sessions with a pediatrician and an RD. This Issue.

Recruitment began 2 RD MI sessions. Fruit and 6. Design Nonrandomized clinical trial. Two patients in the minimal group and 3 in the intensive group Our study protocol stipulated eligibility for 2 groups of were measured and weighed at 6 months but did not have children aged 3 to 7 years: 1 those with a BMI for age a follow-up survey completed by their parents. Pediatrics ; PubMed Google Scholar. However, additional studies are needed to demonstrate the efficacy of this intervention in practice settings. Fifteen pediatricians belonging to Pediatric Research in Office Settings, a national practice-based research network, and 5 registered dietitians were assigned to 1 of 3 groups: 1 control; 2 minimal intervention pediatrician only ; or 3 intensive intervention pediatrician and registered dietitian.

A total of 91 eligible patients were enrolled from 14 practices between April 1,and November 30, Table 2. Robinson TN Reducing children's television viewing to prevent obesity: a randomized controlled trial. For a future study, the control pediatricians will attend a half-day study orientation and continuing medical education workshop on pediatric obesity. Completed questionnaires were mailed to the Channing Laboratory, Boston, Mass, for analysis. During the training, which was conducted by one of us K.

Pediatricians and registered dietitians in the intervention groups received motivational interviewing training. Dropouts were those patients who did not return for the 1-month minimal and intensive groups or 6-month all groups visits. This rather large differential suggests that motivation may have differed among patients, physicians, or both in these 2 groups. Related Papers.

Get free access to newly published articles. One or 2 of the first MI sessions presented by each pediatrician minimal and intensive groups and RD intensive group only were audiotaped and used for clinical supervision and quality control. Related Papers. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. Purchase access Subscribe now.

Citations They received instruction in the protocol, includ- meters squared. Am J Public Health. Children in the control group mean age, 5. Robert P. Interventions for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in children aged five years and under.

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